ccc Claude Reiss | Antidote Europe

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Persons

Claude Reiss

 

Organization

Antidote Europe

 

Summary

For more than thirty years, Claude Reiss held the position of research director at the CNRS (French National Centre for Scientific Research) and also conducted research at the Jacques Monod Institute. In addition, he taught biology to doctoral students at the University of Lille. He has now retired from his positions in the public sector and is currently conducting his own research as a personal venture in the private sector.

 

Initially trained as a physicist, Claude Reiss conducted his post-graduate studies at the University of San Diego, California. On his return to France, he found himself drawn to the subject of biology. This was at the time when the Frenchmen Jacques Monod and François Jacob had just been awarded the Nobel Prize for their research on the genetics of bacteria.

Claude Reiss studied biophysics, before progressing to molecular biology and subsequently, toxicology. His research focused on two main areas of interest:

  • protein translation and the folding mechanism: exploring this subject would lead him to put forward several hypotheses as to the possible origins of such neurological diseases as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob (the human equivalent of ‘mad cow’ disease ) and multiple sclerosis.
  • the AIDS virus and its reproductive strategy: here Claude Reiss would develop a novel therapeutic approach to this disease, which would subsequently be patented in the United States. A lack of funding is currently holding back the required preclinical studies.

For more than thirty years, Claude Reiss held the position of research director at the CNRS (French National Centre for Scientific Research) and also conducted research at the Jacques Monod Institute. In addition, he taught biology to doctoral students at the University of Lille. He has now retired from his positions in the public sector and is currently conducting his own research as a personal venture in the private sector.

He played a leading role in organising two European workshops on the subject of cellular and molecular toxicology. The first was held in Sophia Antipolis in 1996, and the second in Paris in 1999. The latter led to the publication of the book: Molecular Responses to Xenobiotics, under the editorial supervision of G. Labbe, H. Parvez, S. Parvez and C. Reiss (Elsevier publishers, 2001).