ccc Interviews | Antidote Europe

Are animal models predictive?

There are many ways in which animals are used in science, but their role as models for predicting human outcome is especially controversial. Read ‘Are animal models predictive for humans?’ by Niall Shanks, Ray Greek and Jean Greek, originally published in Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine.

Press Release: Scientists question value of monkey experiments

An article published in the peer-reviewed Medicolegal and Bioethics presents a rare challenge not just to the ethics but also to the science of using non human primates in research.

Interviews

 

Date

Sat 11 Feb 2012

 

Summary

Dr Bernard-Pellet explains why we should teach medical personnel and patients the art of healthy living through sensible lifestyle and nutrition.

 

Date

Sat 3 Dec 2011

 

Summary

The following interview is with a scientist who wishes to remain anonymous. Her determination to pursue a scientific career without conducting animal experiments is an example for others to follow.

 

Date

Mon 19 Sep 2011

 

Summary

Dr Stallwood, who teaches medical undergraduates using increasingly realistic manikins and models, argues that to influence the public against animal experiments, “we must communicate specifics, not slogans.”

 

Date

Mon 23 May 2011

 

Summary

Anne Keogh — currently Professor in Medicine and Senior Heart Transplant Cardiologist at St Vincent’s Hospital and President in 2000/01 of the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation — vehemently opposes the use of animal models in heart research on both ethical and scientific grounds.

 

Date

Tue 8 Feb 2011

 

Summary

An assistant professor of ophthalmology, Dr Kaufman explains that learning ophthalmic surgery does not require practicing on animals.

 

Date

Wed 29 Sep 2010

 

Summary

Dr Elisabeth Devilard, formerly a cancer researcher, is now senior scientist at cosmetics manufacturer L’Occitane. “The progress made in the last ten years in the field of molecular biology, coupled with our knowledge of the biology of human skin, provides us with an unprecedented arsenal of reliable techniques that clearly surpass animal tests,” she says.

 

Date

Thu 15 Jul 2010

 

Summary

In 2003 Neal Barnard was awarded a $350,000 research grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the effect of a low-fat vegan diet on diabetes. In this interview with Dr Andre Menache, Dr Barnard explains how people were able to reduce their medications and sometimes come off them entirely.

 

Date

Tue 15 Jun 2010

 

Summary

Dr Ray Greek is author and co-author of five books that challenge the value of animal experiments from a strictly scientific perspective. His latest book, entitled Animal Models in Light of Evolution (co-authored with Professor Niall Shanks), deals in considerable detail with the question of predictivity.

 

Date

Tue 16 Mar 2010

 

Summary

As a veterinary student in Australia, Andrew Knight campaigned for humane education — and succeeded!

 

Date

Tue 15 Sep 2009

 

Summary

As a member of the Safer Medicines Campaign, Margaret Clotworthy points out a number of new developments in medicine, including a recent innovation by VaxDesign of Florida in mimicking the complex human immune system.

 

Date

Tue 16 Jun 2009

 

Summary

Yeast, a type of fungus, is an excellent model for studying many basic cellular processes. Its cellular machinery, with the DNA in a structure called the nucleus, is shared with virtually all other organisms — including humans.

 

Date

Tue 16 Dec 2008

 

Summary

The massive production of genetically modified animals, especially mice, has led to much hype in the media about prospective cures for a whole range of human conditions. However, new genetic data suggests that mouse models may not be relevant for studying human disease.

 

Date

Tue 16 Sep 2008

 

Summary

As a postdoctoral fellow, Michael Coleman sought to reduce drug toxicity in patients using research based on various animal- and human-based models. When he did eventually succeed in producing a therapeutic regimen that reduced the toxicity of a sulphone drug, dapsone, he was struck by the relative uselessness of the animal models.

 

Date

Tue 17 Jun 2008

 

Summary

A highly respected cardiologist, by October 2004 Dr Pippin had become an outspoken opponent of vivisection and an advocate for alternative research methods, He was also founding director of cardiovascular medicine and medical imaging at the Cooper Clinic. Clinic founder and president Dr. Kenneth Cooper gave him an ultimatum: stop his public opposition to animal research or leave the clinic.

 

Date

Tue 12 Dec 2006

 

Summary

Dr Bailey spends much of his time communicating the scientific basis of opposition to vivisection to the public, to politicians of the UK and European parliaments.